Rodney Bay

13 days 21 hours 25 minutes 53 seconds

We left Mindelo hoping for a 16 day crossing but had far more wind than we thought we would making for a fast crossing. We don’t think the magnitude of being here in the Caribbean will sink in for some time!

With 2 days to go, we met up with the yacht Mamosa & duly took photos and video of each other, & would swap images once in the marina in Rodney Bay. We wanted to make landfall in daylight mainly for safety but also to see the east and north coastline. This meant slowing down on our last night so we reduced down to a double reefed mainsail only making about 5 knots in 18 knots of wind. However the Atlantic had other ideas about our speedand gave us a night to remember. At 11pm on my watch the wind suddenly increased to 35 knots and the first of 4 full blown squalls hit with really heavy rain. We’d never seen this before and it was something inbetween exciting and worrying as we had no idea how long each would last. In the end Nick & I stayed in the cockpit all night in case the weather worsened. The Atlantic certainly gave us something to remember.

Daylight came and the island of St Lucia, although blanketed in cloud, was a great sight to see. We were welcomed to the Caribbean by a finish line yacht which was a 2017 arc+ yacht, and allocated a berth in the marina.Β  Applause all round, horns sounded from other yachts and the formal process of being handed rum punch and fruit… that tasted so good!

We had Suds laundry take away our heavy bulky washing which was returned the same day at a very reasonable price, washed Silhouette and I need to make a note of the items which need looking at on board over the next week or so.

Rum punch anyone πŸ™‚

 

Nearly there!

Nick writes

Subject to catastrophe we are now starting our last full day at sea . We have about 140 miles to go with already 2021 having passed beneath the keel. Last night was again a great sail with hourly average speeds ranging from 6.9 to 7.3knts and a real roller coaster as we sped into the night. Ian and I have been hand steering through the night, every night to save on the battery power that would been used by the Autohelm. It has been great fun although towards the end of a 4 hour watch the course gets a bit erratic!

Yesterday we were slowly overhauled by Mamosa a Norwegean yacht from the rally and just before sun down were close enough to get some great photos of them being thrown around by a confused sea. They were running with full genoa and stay sail poled out and no main compared to our double reefed main and part rolled and poled genoa. The sea has a NE swell running with an E’ly wave pattern on top. It has made the last few days difficult to move about the boat and impossible to stay still. The photos show this really well.

Having overtaken us we think Mamosa reduced sail for the night and subsequently slowed down so that we were within a mile of each other over night. Not ideal but now daylight has arrived they are again pulling away.

This is likely to be my last blog so I was thinking over night what to write and came up with this drivel.

My greatest concern about making this trip was that we would not be friends by the end of it. We have known Ian and Caroline for about 23 years and Charlotte for not much less and have always got on well but have never spent more than a few days in close company and for us to now spend best part of 2 months together seemed to court disaster. They are of course very laid back but we are much more buttoned up. At one of the briefings Chris Tibbs told a tale of a crew falling out over the eating of cheese and the importance of nipping problems in the bud. So we bought lots of cheese and agreed to talk through frustrations as they arose. So far I,C & C have not raised anything with us but I have got precious about a few things and aired these along the way (sorry guys). Overall my initial concerns have been unfounded, we have had a great time and unless they have stored something up for when we arrive in St Lucia I think that we will be heading home to turn the central heating up the best of friends. Now where is that cheese…………

Talking of food,we have had great food throughout, although it turns out Ian doesn’t like my cooking! So thank you to all of the cooks and the procurement officers.

The boat has performed very well and despite the amount of stuff on board has shown itself to be a slippery thing through the water. Perhaps the French do know how to build a boat after all. Remember though, many a slip between cup and lip.

Having a water maker with a 150 litres per hour capacity has been a real boon. Ian has kept the tanks topped up so that we have been able to do clothes washing and have showers on a regular basis. The less than stable conditions of the last few days has however meant that showering is not practical. Its hard enough to stand up without trying to do it covered in soap! This means using a flannel and having a strip wash. I believe some people call them face clothes but as they are used to wash more than your face it doesn’t seem appropriate. Just remember to start at the top and work your way down. The next day you need to forget where you finished the day before and start at the top again!

So to finish the sailing’s been great, the boats been great, the foods been great (come on Ian surprise us and cook a meal) and the company has been great. Thanks Guys.

Sunday’s Blog is full of Grace

Nicks Bit

Just finished the 4am to 8am shift which has been a blast. The hourly average speed has ranged between 8.1 and 7.0 Knts since midnight with winds ranging between 16 and 22 knts up the chuff. There is a small swell of about 1m and only a slight sea so we are creaming along with single reefed barn doors (see earlier explanation) open .

Its a bit overcast this morning but expect this will soon burn off. The weather is warm so that even at 4am it was Tee shirt and shorts.

I did my daily rig check just as I came off watch. So far I think that we have had very little damage from chafe as we have everything pulled down quite hard to minimise movement. This morning I found that the split pin that keeps the forestay cotter pin in place had closed up and was in danger of dropping out. This holds the mast up so split pin was given a good talking to and now has its legs well apart. The only other key issue we found a few days ago was the the spinnaker boom track was starting to pull away from the mast due to pressure of holding one of the barn doors open. We have reinforced this with two lashings pulled bar tight on a winch and a webbing ratchet strap also bar tight. So far this temporary repair appears to be working.

With only a mere 462 miles to go,(and getting less by the minute) the end is in sight and we have started talking as though the job is done. Quite funny given that until this year none of us had done anything near this kind of mileage. But the old adage “many a slip between cup and lip” should be kept in mind and we should not start to count our chickens until the eggs have hatched otherwise we may find that pride comes before a fall!

Talking of cups and slipping, we have a plastic coated apron for the cook to wear while cooking to project them from hot spills which are all too easy on a rocking boat. All good when worn but the other day whilst carrying a cup holder with 4 cups of hot tea a spill occurred whilst not worn. A nasty scald could have been the result had ice not been swiftly applied. Fortunately no permanent damage done and still sufficient ice left for the Pimms and G&T’s. Yes (for all you smart arses) we do use anti spill cups when its rough but tea only tastes good when in a china cup is used so we use these whenever practical.

And.. Talking of a rocking boat, have you heard the argument about wether Dire Straits or the Rolling Stones are the best band. Has to be the Rolling Stones in my view but apparently there are some who do not agree. They need educating clearly. Q music………..

Skippers bit

It’s hot, damn hot !!!

corrections & revelations!

Skipper writes

So it appears the huge mahi mahi we caught was in fact a Dorado, fish ID really isn’t our strongest attribute.
And moving on from Nick’s comment yesterday, I have found out that there are ring pulls on the tins on board which open just like coke cans………. Who knew ?!!!!! (sarcasm)

We now have 550 miles to go. We’ve been surprised by the amount of pull south we have had, which means our diect line to St Lucia would actually end up taking us to Trinidad! Either tomorrow or monday morning we will alter course and take down the poled out genoa. This will mean both sails out on the same sided for the first time since leaving Las Palmas, which should give us a faster sail to the north coast.

BTW, yesterday morning a whale popped up alongside no more than 6 feet from us. The crew were very excited but I just wanted it to go away… one gentle flick of its powerful tail could’ve easily damaged our rudder!

Day 10 I think

Yesterday just before dusk we caught a huge mahi mahi, can’t wait to show you all the photos! When we left the UK we had a high quality rod and reel which was stolen in a Coruna. Since then we’ve bought 2 more reels which have both failed during the trip. Out comes a hand line with 2mm line on it and 20 minutes later we land the biggest fish I’ve ever seen personally!

Back to the more mundane bits… the weather has settled and we have stable weather until Saturday if the forecast is to be believed. We have some chafe issues which are monitored, chafe is certainly a big thing for all yachts at sea for a long time. We hear on the radio of other yachts with broken forestays, damaged rudder through impact (whales?) so must be vigilant, getting to Rodney bay safely is the main thing. The YB tracker which you can see through the web is giving us an eta of Wednesday lunchtime which is local time. If the conditions remain as they are it could mean 14 days or very slightly under.

I’m sure I can smell the rum!

Nicks Bit

Spectacular night sails over the past few days with a generally clear sky and late rising of the moon we have had billions of stars lighting our way as we scoot along with the barn doors open at 6 to 7 knts. Really great fun helming in such conditions doing single handed watches with the ear buds and the ipod turned up listening to Pink Floyd, the Stones, Bowie and many others. As the night progresses and the moon rises behind us its like having a car with full head lights on following us along a country lane.

The temperature is really warm now and even at night we have been sailing mostly in just shirt and shorts. The heat that is in some of the winds is what I would expect on land on a hot day. At the half way stage we all had a paddle off the back of the boat, we were going too fast to take a swim (or were we just scared of the sharks!!. The water was really warm and not at all like swimming in the Atlantic off the north Cornwall coast, is it really the same ocean?

Our provisioning seems to have worked out well so far with really good meals and no shortages. We do seem to have a surplus of loo rolls and peanuts not to mention tinned tomatoes. Does anyone recognise a common theme here with the provisioning on Sea Spine? I must report that the skipper has now contributed to the cooking by opening a tin or two. I suspect that this will be the full extent of his culinary exploits on this trip.

leg 2 day 7

Nicks writes

Now into our 7th day at sea on the second leg. The winds have moderated from what they were and we are now trucking along at 6 to 7 knts dead down wind with the barn doors open (main out one side and the Genoa poled out on the other). The sun is out and the wind is warm for the most part although at night the wind gets a bit cool as dew is formed.

There always seems something to be doing and so to date have not got bored although with another 9 ish days to go there is still plenty of opportunity for that to set in. Thankfully no further fish have been caught but they keep trying so I guess my luck won’t hold out forever.

Although we know some boats are operating dry for the whole trip, we elected to have a sundowner each evening which has proved very popular. At this time of day the sun is on the foredeck and so when weather permits we all sit up there and enjoy the last of the days sunshine. It is now dark by about 1800 and so drinks occur early. To accommodate the time difference between Cape Verde and St Lucia which is about 4 hours we are turning our clocks back 15 mins each day which works well for the setting of the sun but, as all of the radio call in schedules are based on Unitary Time (GMT to older people) it is beginning to throw up some odd times when the skipper is making the calls.

Skipper writes

Some of the calls I make are not met with approval. When we get in I have a lot of sucking up to do 😦

As I write this we have just over 1100 miles to do according to the chart plotter so tomorrow evening will mean we are over half way. The crew have already started guessing arrival dates. If we can maintain the average speed we’ve been doing for the last few days it’ll be next Wednesday but we’ll have a much clearer idea in 3 days time.

Caroline writes
“still can’t be arsed” !!!

Carol will write a book….eventually
Ha Ha.
We are all looking forward the half way point of our Ocean sailing and have planned an extra special meal of dates wrapped in serreno ham and steak with all the trimmings accompanied with, a bottle of bubbly already chilling in the fridge. Charlotte is planning a play list for the day,
Initially many of us had considered a swim mid Atlantic, but the seas are still lumpy and Caroline saw a shark alongside the boat 2 days ago. Perhaps dipping our toes in, but only after the skipper has tested the waters first.

Charlotte writes
“I’m still here and writing on the sailing silhouette facebook and I’m not doing it twice” !

Finally !

We’ve had 3 days of unpleasant wind and seas with constant mid to high 20 knots and gusts up to 34! This isn’t trade wind sailing as we were told… Washing machine springs to mind. That said I (notional skipper) have the current speed record of 10.8 knots πŸ™‚
Today Monday the winds have finally abated and we actually do have trade wind sailing conditions of 15 knots and a calming sea…. phew! Showers all round, washing and water making completed.
We have 3 water tanks on board and have accidentally left a seacock open on one after putting fresh water in meaning its contaminated now with sea water…. as I’m only the notional skipper we all know it was Caroline’s fault !!!

Now of course the winds will die completely !